chemeketa students

Monthly Archives: January 2017

Safe Zone offers inclusive space for all students

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Holiday potlucks, a wall of encouragement, Friday movie nights— Chemeketa’s student Safe Zone might be the closest thing to a dorm commons on Salem’s campus.

The Safe Zone is a multi-purpose space for students, providing academic, social and emotional support for the college community. Perhaps most importantly, the Safe Zone provides a place of acceptance for our diverse student body—including our LGBTQ+ community and anyone facing personal hardships or struggling to find acceptance.

“One thing that we see all too often is that things that are outside of the schools control affect student success far more than anything else,” said one student visitor. “This space has really become a place students can use to escape that which might otherwise negatively affect their success.”

This includes student concerns regarding the Presidential election. “The staff remain politically neutral but supportive to what the students are saying and expressing,” the student said.

While the goals of the Safe Zone are serious, the atmosphere in the space is light-hearted and comfortable.

“A new person came in the other day. They were quiet and mostly listened, but they laughed a lot. We’re pretty funny,” said Riss, a second year student pursuing a transfer degree.

Another student agreed, saying the Safe Zone is a good place to relax and get to know people. “A friend dragged me in here and I never left,” he said.

If you or anyone you know feels isolated or fearful of judgement, please consider visiting the Safe Zone.


The Safe Zone & Student Resource Center

Resources available to all students—

  • Support from student leaders, including connections to college resources
  • Computer and no-cost printing for college assignments
  • Microwave and fridge

Bldg. 2, Rm. 229 (Salem campus)
Monday, 8 am-5 pm
Tuesday-Friday 8 am-7 pm

* Some names redacted to protect the anonymity of students.


Disaster Behavioral Health workshop at Eola Feb. 8 & 9

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Experiencing or witnessing a disaster can seize the emotional well-being of survivors and first-responders in a paralyzing grip. What is a disturbing headline for people removed from the incident can be a life-changing trauma for participants. Regrettably events like the shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, the flooding in Turner, the wildfires across Oregon, or the Oso mudslide in Washington State press upon us the cold truth that we should not expect to be exempt from danger.

We can learn from people who have been forced to think about the unthinkable. Chemeketa’s Threat Management Resources program is sponsoring a two-day workshop to prepare us to recover and support the healing of others affected by tragedy –

Disaster Behavioral Health
Leading and Moving Forward
February 8-9, 2017
Northwest Wine Studies Center
Chemeketa Eola

Featured speakers include Kaitlin Roig-DeBellis, a Sandy Hook Elementary teacher and Kristina Anderson, who survived the Virginia Tech shooting.

Presentations will include –

  • Learning from Umpqua Community College
  • Psychological first aid
  • Disaster aftermath, grief and emotional impact
  • Belief systems and disaster: spirituality, faith and belief
  • Cross-cultural considerations and unique populations
  • Resources for collaboration

Chemeketa’s Rebecca Bolante, director of Threat Management Resources suggests the content of the workshop will benefit professionals working in –

  • School counselling
  • Risk management
  • Psychology
  • First response
  • College counselling
  • Emergency planning
  • Disaster relief
  • Religious organizations

Participation costs $395 and 15 continuing education units are available. To register or get more information, call 503.399.8179. Learn more about Chemeketa Threat Management Resources on its website.