chemeketa students

Monthly Archives: June 2017

Earn Payroll Certificate in Saturday Classes

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Student Abby RichardsonBeginning fall term, 2017 Chemeketa’s accounting program will offer students the opportunity to earn a certification in payroll in Saturday classes.

“This is a great opportunity for employed professionals to add a payroll specialty to their professional skill set,” said instructor Lana Tuss, CPA.

Student Abby Richardson completed the program this past year, “My employer is already benefitting from my education,” she said.

The three-term sequence of classes feature two hours of in-class instruction on Saturdays with coursework completed online. Courses to earn the credential are –

Fall Term 2017

BA 211 Financial Accounting 1 Saturday, 9-10:50 am

Winter Term 2018

BA117 Payroll Saturday, 9-10:50 am
BA228 Computer Accounting Applications Saturday, 11 am-12:50 pm

Spring Term 2018

BA224 Human Resource Management Saturday, 9-10:50 am
BA276 Advanced Payroll Saturday, 11 am-12:50 pm

Completion of the certificate prepares students to compete for jobs as a payroll specialist or start their own payroll service.

All of the classes may be applied to the AAS Accounting degree and are transferable to Oregon Universities.


Chemeketa holds 61st commencement

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

They believed. They achieved. They did it.

Chemeketa held its 61st commencement ceremony June 20 at the Oregon State Fairgrounds Pavilion, awarding degrees and certificates to 688 graduates.

“I urge you to use your new knowledge and skills to continue to open your mind to new possibilities,” President Julie Huckestein told the graduates. “Education is power. Use it wisely and no matter what else you do in life, no one can ever take your education away from you.”

Board of Education Chairperson Ron Pittman compared education to his background in insurance sales.

“Insurance helps us manage the risk of uncertainty,” Pittman said. “I can’t say that your education will safeguard you completely, but I have no doubt it will strengthen you ability to respond to hard times and uncertainty.”

You can view the Facebook photo album by Terri Jacobson by clicking this link.

Below you can view a commencement highlight video provided by AO Films along with the student highlight video shown during the ceremony.


Theater Classes Return to Chemeketa

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Jay Gipson KingActing and theater appreciation classes return to Chemeketa fall term. Local theater veteran Jay Gipson-King authored the curriculum and will teach the classes.

Gipson-King knows his way around the footlights. He wrote, produced and acted in his first play for a seventh grade talent show. Since then Gipson-King has been very active in the Salem theater scene and taught theater at Chemeketa before classes were suspended in 2011.

The Acting 1 class (CRN:TA141) focuses on using the instruments of body, voice and mind. Gipson-King maintains acting is easy until we have to stand on stage and say words in front of people, “That’s when we get the sweats and forget what to do with our hands.”

Gipson-King intends to create a safe place for acting students to take risks, “We’ll play lots of games and fun exercises.”

Intrinsic benefits for students taking the acting class according to Gipson-King include increased self-confidence, better public speaking skills, improved teamwork, stronger trust and deeper empathy.

The Theater Appreciation Class (CRN: TA110) will provide opportunities to read, watch and discuss plays.

“It will help students appreciate all forms of performance, like TV and movies, and not just the stage,” says Gipson-King.

Both classes fulfill arts and letters requirements for transferring to Oregon universities.

For more information, email jay.gipson.king@chemeketa.edu.


“Make yourself a safe place”

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Nicole MainsThere is an uncommon rapport between Nicole and Wayne Maines that you might not expect at first. The long-legged young woman in strappy heels and the dad-bodied man in ill-fitting khakis don’t appear to be a pair until you sense their love for each other and hear their story. The Maines spoke in the Chemeketa Auditorium on Thursday, June 8. Their talk reinforced the message of the book about their family, Becoming Nicole: the Transformation of an American Family.

Nicole was designated male at birth and started expressing a feminine identity at the age of three. Her father Wayne had very rigid expectations for how boys should behave, and he struggled to accept this family dynamic.

“I was the one who needed to transition,” Wayne told the crowd. “Nicole always knew who she was.”

Nicole as a young adult is grounded and forthright in telling her story. She’s had years to practice. Since childhood she would introduce herself as “a boy who wants to be a girl.” She paid all the prices, such as bullying and alienation, but her spunky spirit and the support of her family pulled her through the dark times.

Now she and her father advocate for transgender individuals and their families. She urges open communication and acceptance of transgender individuals as just another flavor in the melting pot that is our culture.

The Maines note that great progress has been made. For example the appearance of transgender characters in popular entertainment is helping to reduce the stigma. They worry about slipping back though and cite the removal of federal protection for transgender individuals.

“Now that it’s left up to the states,” Nicole reported, “I could be fired or evicted in over half the country.”

“What you can do in response,” said Wayne, “is to make yourself a safe place.”