chemeketa students

Chemeketa mock trial team holding own with universities

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Chemeketa mock trial team“Chemeketa Community College goes up against the University of Washington.”

“Chemeketa Community College faces Oregon State University.”

“Chemeketa Community College will square off with the University of Oregon.”

A community college in any sort of competition with large, prominent universities of the Northwest is not common. But a group of Chemeketa students have been doing just that and have been holding their own against their university counterparts.

Meet the mock trial team of Chemeketa Community College.

“They’re the underdogs, and they know it,” said Maria Cruse, a political science instructor at Chemeketa and the team’s adviser.

Underdogs still have their days. At the Emerald City Open tournament in early December, Chemeketa received judging victories against teams from Oregon State University and the University of Washington and finished ahead of OSU and University Of Oregon teams in the final standings.

“It definitely puts us in a position where we feel we need to work that much harder to earn the respect of the judges and the other teams,” student Trey Dean of Keizer said. “When it comes down to competition, we hold our heads high and do our best and know we’re at the same level as our university competitors.”

The team showed off their skills to the Chemeketa community during a showcase in the Salem campus auditorium on Jan. 28, a warm-up for the spring national championship season. The team’s regional tournament is scheduled for Feb. 7 & 8 in Boise.

This is the second year of Chemeketa’s mock trial team, birthed out of Cruse’s background as an attorney and what she saw as a need for students taking her courses.

“My idea behind it was I saw students that were exceptionally bright and wanting some kind of extra activity to challenge themselves outside of class,” Cruse said.

In the case of many of those students, including team captain Jesse Thompson of Silverton, participating in mock trial was a completely unplanned experience.

“When I came to school, I came to school because I had nothing to do,” Thompson said. “Then I go to my first class, political science, and Maria Cruse started to bring up these ideas of mock trial and things beyond just school and why you should be in school.”

Delia Rivera, who came to Chemeketa from Southern California, wound up on the team after she walked into the wrong classroom.

“So I just told myself, ‘you know what, let’s try it out one day and see how it goes’,” she said. “And I actually liked it, so I stuck around.”

Mock trial teams at the community college level are extremely rare. Cruse noted Chemeketa is the only community college with a team in the American Mock Trial Association’s local region, which includes northern California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Utah.

Part of the reason for that is simply a matter of the amount of time students are in school compared to universities. Cruse notes teams from four-year schools often have junior and senior students competing, putting Chemeketa at a regular experience disadvantage and having to learn the policy and procedure aspects of mock trial competition in a tighter time frame.

Thompson literally started from scratch last year.

“I remember not even knowing where to begin, like ‘what do I read first?’ None of it made any sense, “ Thompson said. “I hardly knew the difference between defense and prosecution.”

Dean of Social Sciences R. Taylor said another challenge the Chemeketa team faces is the time demands on the team outside of school.

“Many of them have to work, sometimes even more than one job, to support themselves and pay for school,” Taylor said.

Competition is rigorous, and begins in August, when the case students will be using in competitions for the year comes out. The case consists of over 130 pages of documentation and depositions that student will spend months pouring over.

The team spends hours developing theories to be able to prove each side of the case. That’s important, since competitions consist of multiple rounds of head-to-head competition against other schools where the students will take on the roles of both plaintiff and defendant, developing questions for examination, cross-examination and acting as witnesses.

“You have to know your affidavit,” Cruse said. “You have to be able to articulate your team’s position. You have to stay with your team’s theory.”

Thompson said the team meets as a whole or in smaller groups at least four times a week, for several hours at a time. Preparation close to a tournament can include all-day meetings.

“It’s a little more than a part-time job, sometimes,” Thompson said.

But after competition day, Cruse points out, there are important skills students take out of mock trial. These include public speaking and critical thinking. Students are also choosing to stay at Chemeketa to complete their associate’s degrees instead of transferring early to a university, she said.

Dean called mock trial “practice for life”.

“It’s definitely helped increased my active listening skills,” he said. “It also really highlighted my weaknesses as well. I’ve learned areas to put more focus on to become a more successful student.”

College administration have also been strong backers of the team. Taylor traveled up to Seattle to watch the team compete. Executive Dean David Hallett, who like Cruse comes from a law background, said during the showcase having Chemeketa compete in mock trial with the largest universities in the Northwest is a privilege and honor.

“I have deep love and respect for what our students are doing here,” Hallett said. “It means a lot to me personally.”

Personal meaning is seen in Thompson, as competing in mock trial has changed his educational path. He started at Chemeketa without a major and simply wanting to maintain the minimum grades to keep his financial aid, but now wants to either pursue a Ph.D in political science or attend law school.

“It changed every reason why I was in school, let alone where I was going,” he said. “It gave me direction.”

 


Accreditation committee visiting Chemeketa April 8-10

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Accreditation committee visiting ChemeketaThe Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities is conducting its year 7 evaluation of how Chemeketa Community College is fulfilling its mission. A committee representing the Commission will visit Chemeketa April 8-10, 2015 to gather evidence to evaluate whether Chemeketa’s accreditation should be renewed. The Commission’s most recent visit to Chemeketa was in 2012.

Members of the public are invited to send comments regarding Chemeketa’s qualifications for accreditation directly to the Commission by March 8, 2015 –

NW Commission on Colleges and Universities
8060 165th Avenue N.E., Suite 100
Redmond, WA 98052
425.558.4224 (Voice)
425.376.0596 (Fax)

Signed statements will be forwarded as received to the Commission, Chemeketa and its
evaluation committee. You may obtain instructions on the website www.nwccu.org under
Standards and Policies and then Operational Policies or you can call the commission at
425.558.4224.

Previous accreditation reports are published on our website.


MLK celebrated at Chemeketa

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

MLK CelebrationChemeketa’s MLK Celebration on Jan. 29 was an event of music, history and challenges.

The music was courtesy of two local musicians. Rich McCloud is well known as a solo artist in the Salem music scene and provided several acoustic pieces. Chemeketa student Anthony Dixon also performed, doing an a cappella version of freedom song “O Freedom” and a rendition of Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are a-Changin’”. Student Jessica Sabrowski also read a poem.

The challenge was provided by Taylor Marrow, a history instructor at the college. Specifally, Marrow challenged of, after celebrating Dr. King, to get down to doing what he strove for in life.

“We as individuals should accept the challenge of being a leader,” Marrow said.

The event’s keynote speaker, Millie Harmon, provided the history.

Harmon, an Army veteran who was the first African-American to be hired at Chemeketa as a full-time instructor, talked about the many sacrifices women made during the civil rights movement and how many of them are not as well-known as their male counterparts. A point she demonstrated by asking people to name female civil rights leaders.

“By and large, people come up with Rosa Parks and they’re done,” Harmon said.

Harmon talked about more than ten different women who served valuable roles in the civil right movement, including Dorothy Height, Mamie Till, Daisy Lampkin and Mahalia Jackson.

“I submit there are lots of women who had they not been there doing their part, we wouldn’t be where we are today,” Harmon said.

The celebration was sponsored by Chemeketa’s Multicultural Student Services.

 


MLK Celebration to be held at Chemeketa Jan. 29

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

MLK Celebration at ChemeketaAn annual event honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. will be held at Chemeketa Community College.

The MLK Celebration, sponsored by the college’s Multicultural Student Services, will take place from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Thursday, January 29 in the Student Center of Building 2 on the Salem campus.

The event will feature the following two speakers –

Keynote speaker Millie Harmon holds the distinction of being the first full-time African-American instructor hired at Chemeketa. Harmon is also an Army veteran reaching the rank of captain and was honored in October at the Freedom Fund banquet of Salem-Keizer NAACP Branch 1166.

The second speaker, Wilma Marchbanks, is a local community leader. Marchbanks earned her degree from Chemeketa and is now a drug and alcohol counselor in Salem.

In addition to the speakers, popular Salem musician Rich McCloud and Chemeketa student Anthony Dixon will provide music.

For additional information on the event, contact Linda Ringo-Reyna at 503.399.5143.


Oregon Transfer Days coming to Chemeketa campuses

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Oregon Transfer Days 2012

Chemeketa students can explore the offerings of more than 20 public and private universities during the annual Oregon Transfer Days events at both the Salem and Yamhill Valley campuses.

Started in 2007 to assist community college students in transferring to four-year schools, Oregon Transfer Days brings admissions and recruitment professionals from all seven of Oregon’s public universities along with private and out-of-state universities to all 17 of the state’s community colleges.

In addition, information on the Ford Family Foundation Scholarship program will be available.

The tour of colleges is organized by a task force from the Oregon Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (ORACRAO).

Event dates and times are as follows-

  • Yamhill Valley Campus: 10 am – 1 pm Wednesday, January 21, Building 1.
  • Salem Campus: 10 am – 1 pm Thursday, January 21, Student Center (Building 2)

For more information on Oregon Transfer Days, visit the event’s page on ORACRAO’s website at http://oracrao.org/oregon-transfer-days.

 


Nicole Hernandez featured in gallery through Feb. 13

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Nicole Hernandez featured in art galleryThe works of Chemeketa Community College’s artist-in-residence Nicole Hernandez are now being featured in the Gretchen Schuette Art Gallery on the Salem campus.

“Extensions” will be featured in the gallery through Feb. 13. An artist’s reception will be held from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 21 at the gallery, with a talk from Hernandez at 1:30 p.m.

Hernandez is a 2010 graduate of Chemeketa who went on to receive her Bachelor’s in Fine Arts with honors from Oregon State University.

The pieces of “Extensions” are drawn out of Hernandez’s interest in culture’s obsession with hair and its contribution to the female identity in society, she said in her artist’s statement.

“ ‘Extensions’ questions the feminine ideals that are imposed on girls and women, and those which we often inflict on ourselves,” Hernandez said.

The Gretchen Schuette Art Gallery is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For additional information, contact the gallery at 503.399.2533.


Financial aid & scholarship help in Salem & McMinnville Jan. 10

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

From 9 am to 2 pm on Saturday, January 10, Chemeketa Community College will host a free event to help students attain money for college.

Experts will be available to help returning college students and high school students fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and scholarship applications at both the Salem (Bldg. 6, 4000 Lancaster Drive) and Yamhill Valley (Bldg. 1, 288 NE Norton Lane, McMinnville) campuses.

High school students are encouraged to have a parent accompany them, if possible. Students do not have to be planning to enroll at Chemeketa to get help.

All the following documents should be brought to help complete applications-

  • 2014 federal tax return. If you haven’t filed taxes yet, you can estimate
  • Social Security numbers of student and parents (if any)
  • Other financial records
  • Driver’s license (if any)
  • Alien registration card (if you are not a U.S. citizen)

Find more information on College Goal Oregon at www.collegegoaloregon.org.


Apply now for fall term 2015

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

It’s a new year and you’re on your way to enrolling as a college student. Not sure where to start? Now is the time to begin Chemeketa’s admission process if you plan to attend fall 2015.

 

 

Here’s how to get started-

January-

February-

March-

April-

May-

June-

  • Check your My Chemeketa account and submit any additional requirements for financial aid

July-

August-

  • Register for classes in My Chemeketa
  • Accept your financial aid award letter

September-

  • Attend new student preview day
  • Classes begin late September

Additional enrollment details are available online for transfer and international students.

For more information about admissions call 503.399.5006 or e-mail getstarted@chemeketa.edu.

 


Library offering drop-in sessions to learn new system

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Big changes have come to the Chemeketa Community College Library.

The library has moved to a new search system. This is part of a major cooperative effort of the Orbis Cascade Alliance, a consortium of 37 academic libraries in Oregon, Washington and Idaho that includes Chemeketa.

Having a single shared system will radically change the way Chemeketa patrons search for books, movies, and more.

The library is offering drop-in sessions from 8:30 to 9 a.m. and noon to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday the first two weeks of winter term to help patrons learn to use the new search system.

The library web site has additional information on the transition along with answering frequently asked questions for students, staff and community members.


Chemeketa holiday closure information

By Chemeketa Public Affairs

Winter break closuresDuring winter break, all Chemeketa Community College locations will be closed on the following dates:

  • December 24-26 (Wednesday/Thursday/Friday)
  • December 31 and January 1 & 2 (Wednesday/Thursday/Friday)

The Chemeketa library is fully closed through January 4 to move over to a new system.

All college operations will resume normal operation on the first day of winter term, Monday, January 5.