Small Business Development Center
At Chemeketa Center for Business & Industry
chemeketa students

Hiring Strategies

By Chemeketa SBDC

Knowing whom to hire is a critical factor for every expanding business. As you already know, the image and reputation of your company depends on how your customers view your employees. Your job begins long before the new employee is greeting your public.

The hiring process is not (or shouldn’t be) haphazard. Before you begin, decide why you are bringing on a new employee — define the job. Determine the experience or education level truly required. And know the appropriate salary and benefits for the job. (Appropriate is not only the market rate but your ability to pay and equity within your company.)

If you have not formulated a personnel policy, now is the time. What are the hours to be worked each week, the number of days per week, holiday work and the time and method for overtime pay, fringe benefits, vacation and sick leave, time off for personal needs, training, retirement, a grievance procedure, performance review and promotion, and termination. This may seem overwhelming but it is better to “put up the stop sign before there is a fatal accident,” so to speak.

Often in a small business you will hire a person for a certain job (or tasks) but you should also expect, articulate and cross-train for the most efficient utilization of that employee. Can they pinch-hit for other staff? Is there room to “grow your own” managers? Think not only about the training they will need to get them up to speed on their assigned responsibilities, but also the next steps — what else do they need to learn do within the company?

Rather than deciding who to hire based on intuition, establish an entire hiring process that enables you to determine their worthiness for the position. Review their resume, application and work samples; test the applicant if appropriate for the position; interview the candidate; and check his or her work references. Do not focus on what the candidate has done; rather, find out how they did it.

Interview the candidate, not their resume. Observe and deliberately consider interpersonal skills and motivation level. When it comes time for the hiring decision, your instincts of people will come into play, your ability to separate “good” employees from “bad” ones. However, a word of warning: do not hire someone you believe will turn around. Time is too precious and too expensive to waste on anyone who cannot contribute 100 percent.

There is always concern about what questions are legal in an interview. While is it important to know the laws related to job discrimination, you may be overwhelmed by the “what if” scenarios. According to one expert, there are two simple rules to test whether or not to ask a question. First, is it job related? If it is not, do not ask. Second, is the question presented only to a specific type of candidate? If it is, do not ask.

Make your employee expansion a process. Formalize the entire procedure — you can tweak it over time but establish a system for hiring before you begin.

About Chemeketa SBDC

We provide the tools and environment for small business owners to make great decisions.

This entry was posted in Best Practices. Bookmark the permalink.


Comments are closed.